Doppeltext—Dual Language Spanish/English Don Quixote on your iPad

Doppeltext has a dual language Spanish/English edition of Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes, translation by John Ormsby in two parts:

El ingenioso hidalgo don Quijote de la Mancha
The Ingenious Gentleman Don Quixote of La Mancha

As you read in Spanish on your iPad you can click within a sentence and a translation pops up. This is really awesome!

I tried to download a sample chapter from Amazon to my iPad, but for some reason I couldn’t. I went over to iTunes, and found the book, with a bit of difficulty. The easiest way is to type Doppeltext into the search function of iTunes and a few Doppeltext books will appear in the list.

Your students can take notes while they are reading in iBooks.

Adding Highlights and Notes…

Tap and hold on a word. You can extend the selection to include an entire passage. Then tap “highlight” or”Note”. You can add notes to highlighted passages later by tapping the highlight and then “Note”.

I had a bit of a problem with this at first because I had Speak Selection selected in the Accessibility area under General settings on the iPad. Each time I tried to use the Highlight or Note function, the Speak function came up instead. I turned that off, went back to the book and the highlight and note section functioned as it should.

In the example below I clicked on Calipso and added a note. You can color code the notes, and I chose blue. Students might use different colors for the notes according to some pattern that helps them study their notes later. Note the original text is in soft brown and the translated text has popped up nearby.

You can see a list of your notes and email the notes you have made.

This is how the note looks that iBooks sends out in an email:

Visit my Learning Spanish LiveBinders for information regarding a recording of a Yale course taught by the well-known Robert Gonzalez Echevarria on Don Quixote. Although he suggests a different translator for his course, the Doppeltext edition might be welcome in your work.

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